Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘learning’

Weekly Top Stories Nov 11-17

Mashable Awards

Over the last week, the 5th Annual Mashable Awards has been the top link making its rounds through Summify summaries encouraging Summifyers to nominate their favorite companies, people, sites, apps, games and gadgets. The nomination round has now come to an end and you will hear who the 7 finalists are from each category on Nov 21, followed by a final round of voting and the winners announcement on Dec 19. We’d like to thank everyone who took the time to nominate Summify for Up-and-Coming Social Media Service. A special shout-out is in order for @Athenesowl who voted everyday – thank you! Now onto the rest of this week’s top stories.
 

Top Stories This Week

1. Diaspora Co-Founder Ilya Zhitomirskiy Passes Away At 22



Late last night [November 13], word began to spread around the tech community that one of Diaspora‘s four co-founders, Ilya Zhitomirskiy, had passed away. With much sadness, we’ve now confirmed this terrible news with the Diaspora team. Read more

 
 
 
 
 

2. Earth | Time Lapse View from Space, Fly Over | NASA, ISS


 

3. 10 Things Entrepreneurs Don’t Learn in College



I’ve written before on 10 reasons Parents Should Not Send Their Kids to College and here is also Eight Alternatives to College but it’s occurred to me that the place where college has really hurt me the most was when it came to the real world, real life, how to make money, how to build a business, and then even how to survive when trying to build my business, sell it, and be happy afterwards. Read more

 

4. The Death Of The Spec

Earlier today [November 14], my colleague Matt Burns wrote a post noting that most tablet makers may be largely failing because they’ve sold their soul to Android and are now just in the middle of a spec war, which no one can win. I’m gonna go one step further in that line of thinking: the spec is dead. Read more

 

5. Why Is China Building These Gigantic Structures In the Middle of the Desert? (Update 3)



This is crazy. New photos have appeared in Google Maps showing unidentified titanic structures in the middle of the Chinese desert. The first one is an intricate network of what appears to be huge metallic stripes. Is this a military experiment? Read more

 

Getting the Most from #Summify: How It Works

This is the first part of an ongoing series that will help you better understand how Summify works and how you can get the most out of your summaries. First things first. In order to improve something you need to understand it.

You all know that Summify automatically identifies the most important news stories for you across all of your networks, but how does all that actually happen? Does it have something to do with extra-terrestrial beings from Area 51? Well that’s confidential, but here’s a few things we can say.

How do the algorithms work?

Plug in your social accounts > links are collected > links are filtered > summary arrives!

Accounts

You can plug-in three types of social accounts to Summify: Twitter, Facebook and Google Reader. How many accounts can you plug-in from each service? There is no limit for Twitter, Facebook and Google Reader, add as many as you have!

Collecting links

Once you’ve chosen which accounts to connect, Summify begins analyzing them, collecting all the links found in your news streams. Currently only links to articles (text-based links) are collected. Summify does not consider any other link types: e.g. youtube links, audio links, download links etc. But hey, things change pretty fast around here, so you never know what’s next.

Filtering links: cut the S***

The Summify algorithms use dozens of signals, but in general news that has been shared, liked and retweeted a lot by your friends is considered more important. However, not all of your friends are equal and we pay special attention to those who you interact with more. Global popularity signals such as the total number of times a link is tweeted, or liked and shared on Facebook are also considered, but are less important than the sharing activity of the people closest to you.

Filtering links: learning

The Summify algorithms are also fans of learning. As you continue using Summify, we analyze your click history and understand your interests to further improve your story recommendations.

We understand your interests indirectly by looking at what you click on. We notice if you tend to click more on stories:

  • from a particular user on Twitter, Facebook, or a certain RSS Feed;
  • from a particular domain or with common keywords in the story title; and
  • if you prefer Twitter stories more than Facebook stories.

We hope that this break down has helped you understand how stories make the cut into your summary. On average, for each story that makes it into your summary we reject 150 other less relevant stories, so with Summify you’re reading only the good stuff. Not only is this a huge time saver, it also makes your Twitter and Facebook experience more useful.

To gain a greater perspective on the volume of news being shared and the amount of stories being filtered from your summaries, check out our recent Social Sharing Infographic.

Finally, if you haven’t seen it already, take a peek at our “What is Summify?” video to get a helpful visual representation of some of the things we just covered. Next up: optimizing your summaries.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 87 other followers