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Posts tagged ‘filters’

#SummifyTip: Modifying Summary Sources and Saying “Thanks”

Every story that arrives in your summary comes from your social networks, shared by a human much like yourself. Summify assumes that popular stories being shared by those you follow, are likely to be of interest to you, but that’s not always the case. Just like humans, algorithms aren’t perfect. The solution: tweak your sources and spread content you love.
 

Filter out contributors you don’t enjoy

There are two options here. We recommend trying the first, before making any permanent changes to who you follow on Twitter.

1) Filter domains or human contributors from appearing in future summaries. No change is permanent. Any filters you create will be added to the Filters section of your settings, which can be undone at anytime. Filters are completely private and nobody will ever know if you’ve filtered them out from your summaries.

2) Radically clean your Twitter follow list using iunfollow or more selectively with socialbro. This is a tip from @boichot. Check out our recent Summify Spotlight with him for more tips and tools that will improve your Twitter work-flow.
 

Like a story? Let contributors know. Nothing says “thank-you” better than sharing.

1) Share, Retweet, and Like stories – sharing content that you really like with the world is the best way to show the original author or person who shared it that it’s valued. This will likely lead them to share similar types of content that you will also enjoy. Social signals such as the number of shares, likes, and retweets are a major part of how Summify populates your summaries, so spread the love and share what you like, so that other’s can enjoy it too!

2) Automatically share your summaries to Twitter and Facebook – this is an easy way to share your summaries with your followers each day. To try it out, go to your Sharing settings and select which network you’d like to share to under “Promote.” There are also options for customizing your auto-share message and excluding mentions for contributors.

Note: You can also automatically post your summaries to a Facebook Page, LinkedIn, Instapaper, Read it Later, or Readability using ifttt – a fantastic third party service!

3) After reading your summary, line-up your favorite stories to be shared throughout the day with Buffer. Check out this popular post on how to pair Buffer with Summify – it will change your 2012 social media life – How To Be Awesome On Social Media In 20 Minutes A Day.

Along with the tips above, there’s one more simple thing that will help you improve your summaries.

Summify is designed to handle massive amounts of incoming content and your summaries will tend to get better as you connect more accounts. Haven’t done so already? Give it a try and experience the difference.

Note: you can connect more than one account for each of Twitter, Facebook and Google Reader.

Are you using any of the above methods to enhance your summaries? Maybe you have a tip or two of your own. Share what’s working for you in the comments below.

Getting the Most from #Summify: How to Make Your Summary Better

Most aspects of our lives could benefit from a little clean-up and our content consumption is no exception. Summify filters through heaps of incoming content and helps you consume only the most relevant stories, reducing your stress and increasing your productivity. We have some helpful tips on how to make your summaries even better, but before jumping in to that, take a quick look at our post on How Summify Works for some helpful background.

When piecing together your summaries, Summify considers links from everyone you follow and all of your RSS feeds. Do you really want all of these sources influencing your summary? Maybe not. Here are some helpful ideas on how to manage influencers and maximize your summary’s usefulness.

Optimizing your accounts

The more accounts you connect, the better your summaries will be.

Twitter

1. Clean up your account – only follow people that you’re actually interested in. You can put other users, who you don’t want news from, into Twitter lists. This allows you to receive news from those you follow, while keeping an eye on other useful people. If you’re unsure if you want to follow someone, create a list and name it “new people.” If you like what they share after a couple days, follow them, if not, they’re out!

2. Find interesting people to follow using http://twitter.com/who_to_follow

Suggestions – Twitter accounts suggested for you based on who you follow and more.

Browse Interests – select the topics you are interested in. Browse the list of people and find a few new people you want to hear from.

Find Friends – search through the other services you are using to find your friends who are on Twitter. Look through your Gmail, Yahoo, Hotmail, MSN, AOL and LinkedIn accounts.

Influencers of influencers – who comes to mind as one of the most interesting people you follow? Find your favorite people and look at who they follow; it’s a great way to expand your network and find new people who share similar interests.

Facebook

Since Facebook is used more for casual socializing amongst friends than Twitter is, there is a serendipity in the way our conversations occur, especially between people we don’t interact with all the time. For this reason, we don’t suggest a major cleansing of your “friends” list, unless however, you’re one of those people who adds everyone under the sun. Instead of deleting any friends, our suggestion is to discover pages you like and add them to your News Feed.

Discover Facebook Pages allows you to explore pages you might enjoy. Browse by category, see your current page invites, and see which friends like similar pages to you. Click like on any page to receive updates in your News Feed.

Google Reader

Google Reader shows you all of your favorite sites in one convenient place. It’s like a personalized inbox for the entire web. Watch this one minute video to better understand Google Reader and how to add subscriptions to your account. Now that you’ve been acquainted, you can get started by adding subscriptions from your favorite websites. Not sure where to start? Browse and Search some feed bundles here.

Using Google Reader with Summify allows you to customize which feeds you want considered for your summaries.

1. Connect your Google Reader account by clicking the “g connect” button in your settings

2. Once connected, all of your Google Reader feeds will be imported into Summify. Go to Feed Settings and manually X any feeds you don’t want considered for your summary.

Note: Your Google Reader account does not synch automatically. If you add feeds to your Google Reader and want them considered in your summary you must re-connect your account in Account Settings by re-clicking the “g connect” button. Likewise, if you delete a feed in Google Reader it is not automatically deleted from your Summify feeds. If you would like to delete a feed, you must do so manually in the Feeds area of your settings.

I use a feed reader other than Google Reader

No problem! Import an OPML file to populate your Summify feeds. An OPML file is package of feeds that you can grab from your other feed reader. The button to import an OPML file is in the Feeds area of your settings.

Filters: domains and users

If you realize that a certain domain contributor is responsible for uninteresting stories in your Summary just X them out. In your web summary, hover your mouse on top of the story’s domain source and click the X to filter it out from future summaries. Likewise, hover your mouse on top of any one of a story’s contributors and click the X to filter out their influence from future summaries. You can always undo these actions in the Filters area of your Settings. Your filtering actions are completely private and nobody will ever know when you’ve eliminated them from your summary.


Like button

Using the Like button is a strong positive signal which helps your summary recipe understand what you enjoy reading. There is also another direct benefit to the Like button; when clicked, you “Like” the link on Facebook as well. Give it a try. You can find the Like button in your web summary, when you hover your mouse on a story headline; and on the share bar beside the share button, once you’ve clicked through to read a story.


Summary

Frequency – adjust how often your summaries are generated and how many stories each contains. Increasing your summary’s frequency or number of stories forces Summify to pull more content from your network. This can lead to a broader range of sources appearing in your summary, but only if you follow a significant number of sources on Twitter, Facebook or Google Reader; otherwise your summaries may feel thin. Our recommendation is to keep your summary schedule on the lighter side, to ensure quality. The default schedule is five stories, once per day.

Privacy – we recommend leaving your summary public, as it is by default. Public summaries are better for everyone, enabling others to explore your summaries, and allowing you to discover the summaries of people you know and others you don’t. Here are a few samples:

Kevin Rose – founder of Digg.com
Jay Baer – author of the Convince & Convert blog and co-author of The Now Revolution
Liz Gannes – covers the social web for AllthingsD.com
Jodi Ettenberg – world traveler, former lawyer, legalnomads.com
Emily Leary – communications consultant and blogger, co-founder of #CommsChat
Zee Kane – editor-in-chief of The Next Web

We will continue working hard to send you top notch summaries, but despite our hard work there’s no way we can know you as good as you know yourself. Try out some of the tips we’ve provided you with and fine-tune your summaries to make them that much better.

Everyone uses Summify a little bit differently and we’re sure that many of you have discovered your own nifty ways of enhancing your summaries. Do you have a tip or creative idea on how other Summifyers can get the most out of their summaries? Please share them in the comments section or feel free to pass them on to us at team@summify.com.

Summify Goes Hollywood

Pictures are great, but Videos are even better. Anytime we introduce new features to the Summify experience, expect to see a blockbuster demo posted in living color. Although we learn fast, it may take us some time to release them in 3D – bear with us ;)

Our First Tutorial: Filters and the Dislike Button

As always, keep letting us know how your Summifying is going. More updates on the way!

New Features: Filters, Dislike, Love Button

The Summify algorithms rely heavily on implicit signals to summarize the most important news for you: which friends shared which stories, how important are they to you, what do you like clicking on, and a dozen more factors.

Most of the time that’s more than enough, but sometimes people tell us that they’d like to explicitly tell us which stories aren’t good for them.  We know what you mean – when you only want to read 5 stories, you want all of them to be great! Today, we’re pleased to introduce 2 new features to help with that: Filters and Dislike. Here’s how they work:

Domain Filters

Domain filters allow you to hide certain domains (e.g. foxnews.com) from appearing in your summary. Just click the “View this in your browser” button in your email and hover over the domain and you’ll see a small X button:

Source Filters

Sometimes you might not want to hide a domain, but hide a specific person. Previously you had to unfollow/unfriend them, but now you can just hide them by hovering over their avatar and clicking the X button:

Please note that this only affects Summify and it doesn’t actually un-follow them on Twitter, Facebook, or Google Reader.

Finally, you can remove and manage your existing filters at http://summify.com/filter.

Dislike

Hiding a story or a person is a really strong negative signal, but sometimes you don’t want to be so decisive. For those times, we created a nice Dislike button that appears near the title of the story:

You might be asking, why a dislike button and not a like one? Well, you already tell us that you like a story when you click on it and you spend time reading it, but it’s surprisingly hard for us to figure when you don’t like a story… maybe you’ve already seen it, maybe it’s not interesting, who knows?

Love Button

A lot of people have told us they love Summify, so we’ve added a button that makes it really easy for you to spread the word. Just click these nice big shiny buttons in your emails or on the web:

That’s it for today, expect some more exciting news in the near future!

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