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Posts from the ‘Weekly Top Stories’ Category

Weekly Top Stories: Jan 6 – 12

1. Fotoshop by Adobé


 

2. Search, plus Your World


Google Search has always been about finding the best results for you. Sometimes that means results from the public web, but sometimes it means your personal content or things shared with you by people you care about. These wonderful people and this rich personal content is currently missing from your search experience. Search is still limited to a universe of webpages created publicly, mostly by people you’ve never met. Today, we’re changing that by bringing your world, rich with people and information, into search. Read More

 

3. Why I Hate Android


Why do I hate Android? It’s definitely one of the questions I get asked most often these days. And most of those that don’t ask probably assume it’s because I’m an iPhone guy. People see negative take after negative take about the operating system and label me as “unreasonable” or “biased” or worse.

I should probably explain.

Believe it or not, I actually don’t hate Android. That is to say, I don’t hate the concept of Android — in fact, at one point, I loved it. Read More

 

4. If I Die: Facebook App Lets You Leave Sweet Last Words



Facebook profiles don’t die the same way people do. If I Die is a Facebook app that makes sure, even if you die, your social self can still send out your last wishes and post messages to your friends years after you’re gone. Read More

 

5. Real-Life Examples Of How Google’s “Search Plus” Pushes Google+ Over Relevancy


The new Google “Search Plus Your World” feature — which I’m now simply calling “Search Plus” — has just gone live for me. Huge debate erupted yesterday over whether it somehow favors Google+. I can see now that it clearly does, even more than I thought. Here’s a closer look at the changes, including how they turn Google+ into an essential social network for any search marketer. Read More

 

Weekly Top Stories: Dec 30 – Jan 5

1. This is What Happens When You Give Thousands of Stickers to Thousands of Kids


This December, in a surprisingly simple yet ridiculously amazing installation for the Queensland Gallery of Modern Ar, artist Yayoi Kusama constructed a large domestic environment, painting every wall, chair, table, piano, and household decoration a brilliant white, effectively serving as a giant white canvas. Over the course of two weeks, the museum’s smallest visitors were given thousands upon thousands of colored dot stickers and were invited to collaborate in the transformation of the space, turning the house into a vibrantly mottled explosion of color. Read More

 

2. Apple’s Jonathan Ive gets knighthood in honours list


Jonathan Ive, Apple’s head of design, has been awarded a knighthood in the New Year Honours list.

Mr Ive, who can now style himself Sir Jonathan, has been made a Knight Commander of the British Empire (KBE).

Raised in Chingford, Mr Ive began working for Apple in 1992 and since then has been the brains behind many of its products.

He described the honour as “absolutely thrilling” and said he was “both humbled and sincerely grateful”. Read More

 

3. Kodak Teeters on the Brink


Eastman Kodak Co. is preparing to seek bankruptcy protection in the coming weeks, people familiar with the matter said, a move that would cap a stunning comedown for a company that once ranked among America’s corporate titans.

The 131-year-old company is still making last-ditch efforts to sell off some of its patent portfolio and could avoid Chapter 11 if it succeeds, one of the people said. But the company has started making preparations for a filing in case those efforts fail, including talking to banks about some $1 billion in financing to keep it afloat during bankruptcy proceedings, the people said. Read More

 

4. Welcome to Instagram, President Barack Obama!


We’re excited to welcome President Barack Obama to Instagram! We look forward to seeing how President Obama uses Instagram to give folks a visual sense of what happens in the everyday life of the President of the United States. In addition to sharing photos through the @barackobama Instagram account, the Obama 2012 staff is asking supporters to share their photos from the campaign trail with the tag #obama2012. Read More

 

5. M.I.T. Game-Changer: Free Online Education For All


For Wall Street Occupiers or other decriers of the “social injustice” of college tuition, here’s a curveball bound to scramble your worldview: a totally free college education regardless of your academic performance or background. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (M.I.T.) will announce on Monday that they intend to launch an online learning initiative called M.I.T.x,which will offer the online teaching of M.I.T. courses free of charge to anyone in the world. Read More

 

Weekly Top Stories: Dec 16-22

1. Announcing the 2011 Mashable Awards Winners



Although we did not take home the Up-and-Coming Social Media Service award we’d like to thank everyone in our great community who voted Summify throughout the competition! Congratulations crowdtap, you win this round!

The votes are in and the results have been tabulated: After two months of nominations and voting by our community, Mashable is thrilled to announce the winners of the 2011 Mashable Awards!

The fifth annual Mashable Awards honors the best in Mashable‘s core content areas: Social Media, Tech, Business and Entertainment. Read More

 

2. North Korean leader Kim Jong-il dies ‘of heart attack’



North Korean leader Kim Jong-il has died of a heart attack at the age of 69, state media have announced.

Millions of North Koreans were “engulfed in indescribable sadness”, the KCNA state news agency said, as people wept openly in Pyongyang. Read More

 

3. Type “Let It Snow” on Google for a Pleasant Surprise


 

4. The Top 20 iPhone And iPad Apps of 2011



Editor’s note: Contributor Brad Spirrison is the managing editor of mobile app discovery services Appolicious, AndroidApps.com and AppVee. With this post, he continues an annual tradition of picking the best iOS apps of the year.

It’s telling that Apple chose an app that debuted more than 14 months ago, Instagram, as its “iPhone App of the Year” for 2011. This should not imply that there was a shortage of quality and groundbreaking apps released this year. Far from it. Read More

 

5. Dear Congress, It’s No Longer OK To Not Know How The Internet Works



I remember fondly the days when we were all tickled pink by our elected officials’ struggle to understand how the internet works. Whether it was George W. Bush referring to “the internets” or Senator Ted Stevens describing said internets as “a series of tubes,” we would sit back and chortle at our well-meaning but horribly uninformed representatives, confident that the right people would eventually steer them back on course. Well I have news for members of Congress: Those days are over. Read More

 

Christmas Bonus – Steve Jobs: 20 Life Lessons



My feelings about Steve Jobs have always been a little mixed. I long admired his entrepreneurial spirit and business acumen and was in sheer awe of his natural instincts for what appeals to consumers. On the other hand I bristled at what I saw as his — and by extension Apple’s — occasionally capricious and even contradictory actions (App store products in or out, inability to get in front of product issues, antennaegate) and super-secretive nature. Read More

Weekly Top Stories: Dec 9-15

1. What the World’s Biggest Websites Looked Like at Launch



Since the rise of the Internet in the ’90s, the web has shown no signs of slowing down. We’ve watched the birth and evolution of social media, e-commerce and online video entertainment.

It’s hard to imagine that the treasured websites we all use today were at one point just scribbles on a piece of paper, or the brainchild of a 19-year-old college student. With the help of the Wayback Machine, which provides screenshots of any website imaginable from its inception until now, we’re can view the original designs and content of the most visited websites in the U.S.

Seeing how far the world has come in terms of web design, where do you foresee us heading next?

 

2. New Twitter: 25 Tips and Tricks for Savvy Tweeters



The reorganized and refashioned Twitter.com is a markedly different beast than it was just 48 hours ago [Dec 7]. Now millions of users who call Twitter’s web destination home are looking for help. Perhaps just 25 soupcons of it. If so, look no further than this list of 25 new Twitter tips. Read More

 

3. Apple Made A Deal With The Devil (No, Worse: A Patent Troll)



Over the last two years, Apple has been engaged in vicious legal battles over smartphone patents, many of which are aimed at squelching (or squeezing money out of) manufacturers of devices running Android. And now, for some reason, it has given valuable patents to a patent troll — which is using them to sue many of the top technology companies in the world. Read More

 

4. Why Spotify can never be profitable: The secret demands of record labels



Imagine a new hot-dog selling venture. Let’s also say there’s only one supplier to purchase hot dogs from. Instead of simply charging a fixed price for hot dogs, that supplier demands the HIGHER of the following: $1 per hot dog sold OR $2 for every customer served OR 50 percent of all revenues for anything sold in the store.In addition, the supplier requires a two-year minimum order of 300 hot dogs per day, payable all in advance. If fewer hot dogs are sold, there is no refund. If more than 300 hot dogs are sold each day, payments to the supplier are generated by calculating $2 per customer or 50 percent of total revenues, so an additional payment is due to the supplier. After the first two years, the supplier can unilaterally adjust any of the pricing terms and the shop can never switch suppliers. Read More
 

5. Time’s Person of The Year



No one could have known that when a Tunisian fruit vendor set himself on fire in a public square, it would incite protests that would topple dictators and start a global wave of dissent. In 2011, protesters didn’t just voice their complaints; they changed the world. Read More

 

Top Stories This Week: Nov 25 – Dec 1

1. Disruptions: Fliers Must Turn Off Devices, but It’s Not Clear Why

Millions of Americans who got on a plane over the Thanksgiving holiday heard the admonition: “Please power down your electronic devices for takeoff.”

And absolutely everyone obeyed. I know they did because no planes fell from the sky. No planes had to make an emergency landing because the avionics went haywire. No planes headed for Miami ended up in Anchorage. We were all made safe because we all turned off all our Kindles, iPads, iPhones, BlackBerrys and laptops, just as the Federal Aviation Administration told us to. Realistically speaking, I’m going to bet that a handful of people on each flight could not be bothered, or forgot to comply. Read More

 

2. The shocking truth about the crackdown on Occupy

US citizens of all political persuasions are still reeling from images of unparallelled police brutality in a coordinated crackdown against peaceful OWS protesters in cities across the nation this past week. An elderly woman was pepper-sprayed in the face; the scene of unresisting, supine students at UC Davis being pepper-sprayed by phalanxes of riot police went viral online; images proliferated of young women – targeted seemingly for their gender – screaming, dragged by the hair by police in riot gear; and the pictures of a young man, stunned and bleeding profusely from the head, emerged in the record of the middle-of-the-night clearing of Zuccotti Park. Read More

 

3. Facebook Targets Huge IPO [Video]


Facebook Inc. is inching closer to an initial public offering that it hopes will value the company at more than $100 billion, according to people familiar with the matter.

The social networking firm is now targeting a time frame of April to June 2012 for an initial public offering, said people familiar with the matter. The company is exploring raising $10 billion in its IPO—what would be one of the largest offerings ever—in a deal that might assign Facebook a $100 billion valuation, a number greater than twice that of such stalwarts as Hewlett-Packard Co. and 3M Co. Read More

 

4. Secret Fed Loans Gave Banks $13 Billion Undisclosed to Congress


The Federal Reserve and the big banks fought for more than two years to keep details of the largest bailout in U.S. history a secret. Now, the rest of the world can see what it was missing. Read More

 

5. Startups Are Hard. So Work More, Cry Less, And Quit All The Whining


Suddenly everyone’s complaining about how unfair things are in Silicon Valley. How hard everyone has to work so darn hard, and how some people don’t get venture capital or a nice sale to Facebook or Google even though lots of other people are getting those things.

Silicon Valley is an unfair place, say all the headlines. The CNN racism documentary was just one piece of this. Another are the cries from the press that Zynga would actually consider renegotiating contracts with highly compensated employees no longer pulling their weight. Expect more articles soon about the woes of being asked to work hard at a startup. People are working so hard, they’re crying themselves to sleep! Read More

 

Top Stories This Week: Nov 18-24

1. Police officer pepper-sprays seated, non-violent students at UC Davis


At the University of California at Davis this afternoon [November 18], police tore down down the tents of students inspired by the Occupy Wall Street movement, and arrested those who stood in their way. Others peacefully demanded that police release the arrested.
Read More

 

2. Racism And Meritocracy


Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you can’t have missed the recent dust-up over race and Silicon Valley. Like almost every discussion of diversity and meritocracy in this town, it turned ugly fast. One side says: “All I see is white men. Therefore, people like Michael Arrington must be racist.” The other responds, “Silicon Valley is a colorblind meritocracy. If there were qualified women or minority candidates, we’d welcome them.” Read More

 

3. Announcing the 2011 Mashable Awards Finalists


The seven finalists from each category, spanning the areas of Social Media, Tech, Business and Entertainment have been announced. Thank you to everyone who voted for us; Summify is a finalist for Up-and-Coming Social Media Service! The final round of voting has begun and it will end on Dec 16. You can vote once per day in each category – good luck to all!
Read More
 

4. How Facebook is ruining sharing


I’m afraid to click any links on Facebook these days. No, it’s got nothing to do with the spam attack and the flood of nasty images making their way into news feeds all last week. Instead, it’s because the slow spread of Facebook’s Open Graph scheme is totally ruining sharing. Read More

 

5. Open Letter to Chancellor Linda P.B. Katehi

I am a junior faculty member at UC Davis. I am an Assistant Professor in the Department of English, and I teach in the Program in Critical Theory and in Science & Technology Studies. I have a strong record of research, teaching, and service. I am currently a Board Member of the Davis Faculty Association. I have also taken an active role in supporting the student movement to defend public education on our campus and throughout the UC system. In a word: I am the sort of young faculty member, like many of my colleagues, this campus needs. I am an asset to the University of California at Davis. You are not. Read more

 

Weekly Top Stories Nov 11-17

Mashable Awards

Over the last week, the 5th Annual Mashable Awards has been the top link making its rounds through Summify summaries encouraging Summifyers to nominate their favorite companies, people, sites, apps, games and gadgets. The nomination round has now come to an end and you will hear who the 7 finalists are from each category on Nov 21, followed by a final round of voting and the winners announcement on Dec 19. We’d like to thank everyone who took the time to nominate Summify for Up-and-Coming Social Media Service. A special shout-out is in order for @Athenesowl who voted everyday – thank you! Now onto the rest of this week’s top stories.
 

Top Stories This Week

1. Diaspora Co-Founder Ilya Zhitomirskiy Passes Away At 22



Late last night [November 13], word began to spread around the tech community that one of Diaspora‘s four co-founders, Ilya Zhitomirskiy, had passed away. With much sadness, we’ve now confirmed this terrible news with the Diaspora team. Read more

 
 
 
 
 

2. Earth | Time Lapse View from Space, Fly Over | NASA, ISS


 

3. 10 Things Entrepreneurs Don’t Learn in College



I’ve written before on 10 reasons Parents Should Not Send Their Kids to College and here is also Eight Alternatives to College but it’s occurred to me that the place where college has really hurt me the most was when it came to the real world, real life, how to make money, how to build a business, and then even how to survive when trying to build my business, sell it, and be happy afterwards. Read more

 

4. The Death Of The Spec

Earlier today [November 14], my colleague Matt Burns wrote a post noting that most tablet makers may be largely failing because they’ve sold their soul to Android and are now just in the middle of a spec war, which no one can win. I’m gonna go one step further in that line of thinking: the spec is dead. Read more

 

5. Why Is China Building These Gigantic Structures In the Middle of the Desert? (Update 3)



This is crazy. New photos have appeared in Google Maps showing unidentified titanic structures in the middle of the Chinese desert. The first one is an intricate network of what appears to be huge metallic stripes. Is this a military experiment? Read more

 

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